Ankle Arthritis Pain due to Deltoid Ligament Injury

POSTED ON 12/11/2009 IN Areas Treated BY Christopher Centeno

fußskelett


GS is a 57 year old white male who works on his feet.  When we first examined him several months ago, things were bad.  He injured his left ankle in a car accident in 1973.  He had tried and failed physical therapy, chiropractic, massage therapy and steroid injections into the ankle.  He was miserable, being forced to get off of his feet for several hours a day and spiraling out of control on pain meds and alcohol.  At times he would drink a case a beer a day to manage the pain and continue working.  He was told he needed an ankle fusion, something he had heard might help or might make things worse.  On exam, we noted that not only did he have MRI evidence of severe ankle arthritis and a partially torn deltoid ligament (the ligament that helps to stabilize the inside of the ankle), but he also had other issues such as swollen tendons.  We initiated injections for the inside ankle ligaments and ankle arthritis using his own stem cells.  The result, after the second injection and at the third injection today is that he reports that he's off the booze and pain killers and that his ankle is 90% better.  He no longer has to get off of his feet and his wife's happy that he's not spiraling out of control on prescription drugs and alcohol.  GS's case is another example of how exact placement of cells based on history, exam, and imaging is needed to preserve a severely degenerated joint.  Did GS get a new ankle due to stem cells?  No.  We have simply breathed some new life into his ankle by improving the stability and hopefully helping the joint last a bit longer.

(Please note, this patient was treated with the Regenexx-C cultured stem cell procedure and not Regenexx-SD.  While Regenexx-SD does rely on the same stem cell type that was used to treat these patients and other clinics have reported good results using similar procedures that don't rely on stem cell culturing, Regenexx-SD clinical effectiveness has not yet been established.)

  1. ankle
  2. pain

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