Statin Drugs Kill Nerve Cells

statin drugs kill nerve cells

We’ve been a big critic of Statin drugs since we’ve seen how they can injure adult stem cells in culture,  as matter of fact, statin drugs kill nerve cells.  These side effects have also touched my life personally. I’ll never forget seeing my aunt at a family reunion years ago. She had uncontrollable flatulence due to Statin use. She was a very funny lady so she managed to make a joke of each public display (which happened about every minute), but also recounted how she had just been released from the hospital due to severe eosinophilic myositis, yet another Statin side effect. She had almost died because a Statin drug caused her body to attack her muscles as foreign tissue. She explained that her doctor now had her on a different Statin that didn’t almost kill her, but caused this little problem. What else can Statins do? Less known is that these drugs can injure nerve cells as well as muscle cells. Studies have been emerging that show that these drugs can lead to peripheral neuropathy (damaged nerves). A recent study out this week further confirmed this, showing that some Statin drugs rapidly killed motor nerve cells in a lab experiment. You may have also seen the recent blog post that dark chocolate was as good or better than Statins for reducing the risk of heart attack and stroke. That same blog post highlighted research that also showed Statins cause fatigue by injuring the mitochondria of cells (the little batteries that keep the cells alive). We’ve also seen very real evidence that they can cause widespread muscle pain. The upshot? So let me get this straight, you want me to take an expensive pill for the rest of my life that works no better at reducing my risk for serious illness than a square or two of dark chocolate and is loaded with serious side effects, not the least of which are hurting my stem cells, memory loss, muscle damage, nerve damage, fatigue, and flatulence. But it’s “FDA Approved” you say? No thanks, I’ll stick to chocolate.

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